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A downloadable game

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when you try to start anew, what invisible baggage do you bring along? what does your place in the world lead you to believe is normal? how much do you expect that alien people on alien worlds would be anything like you?

this is a diceless, gm-less, turn-based casual discussion worldbuilding exercise, aimed at creating a space to examine the ways creating worlds from scratch cannot be done without bringing your own culture along.

this game was created as a submission to Not A Game Jam 2019. it is a paired set with All We Know Are The Things We Have Learned, my submission for Folklore Jam.

please email any comments to fencedforestmedia@gmail.com.

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Get this game and 13 more for $35.00 USD
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In order to download this game you must purchase it at or above the minimum price of $2.85 USD. You will get access to the following files:

NO SUCH PLACE.pdf 16 kB
ALL WE KNOW + NO SUCH PLACE.zip 33 kB
if you pay $4.75 USD or more

community copies

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community copies

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(+1)

there is no such place as an empty field is a thoughtful, generative worldbuilder that supports its players while simultaneously demanding from them the active process of decolonization. Where its companion game, all we know are the things we have learned, asks its players where their ingrained beliefs and biases come from, no such place is more forward-facing—asking how we can move beyond them for a more just society. Both of these games succeed as standalone entities but the two speak in tandem, each complementing the themes of the other intrinsically. These games are gentle but firm, unrelenting in their insistence that we can build a better world—but in order to do so, we must first confront ourselves and each other.